Peanut

Walnut

Skystone 2019-2020
This season, being able to move around as efficiently as possible is critical because transporting the stones involves moving across the entire field while avoiding other robots. For this reason, we decided to use a mecanum drivetrain, which can move in all directions quickly. In order to stack stones, we use a dual slide mechanism which includes both vertical and horizontal slides. The vertical slides lift the stone up and can reach up to 8 levels high. The horizontal slide extends using a linkage crank mechanism making the outtake fast and easy. Our intake is an active intake which uses compliant wheels to collect stones. It is spring-loaded, so it can collect stones from almost any angle. The compliant wheels are extremely capable of gripping onto the stones because they are made out of silicon. Our intake uses many custom parts, including 3D printed adapters for the compliant wheels and sides made using a CNC machine. During autonomous, the robot needs to move the foundation and also transport Skystones. In order to move the foundation, we have two servo-powered hooks which can quickly and reliably hang on to the foundation so the robot can pull it. We also have two 3D printed claws to grab Skystones and place them on the foundation.
Cashew

Cashew

Maryland Tech Invitational 2018-2019
We decided early on in the season that the most important game changer would be hanging, so we built our hanger first. We also realized that there was no need to go inside the crater if we can hang in end game, so we decided on an extending arm. We built a mecanum wheel drive that allows more maneuverability. The robot is able to turn in place and move in all directions. By using a lead screw we are able to gain the precision and strength needed to carry our robot. We use two lead screws connected through chain in order to stabilize our robot while hanging. We have double hooks: one to hang in autonomous to get height, and a higher one for End Game to hang fast. Our main scoring mechanism is a simple arm that pivots and can extend into the crater to collect minerals efficiently. Our intake uses rubber bands, which can conform to the shape of minerals and pick them up very consistently. We also have a sorter, allowing us to collect any combination of minerals and score them at the same time.
Hazelnut

Hazelnut

Rover Ruckus 2018-2019
Our Robot uses a meacum drive train to maneuver, as our design does not need to go into the crater with our strategy. We try and target one type of mineral and score in the lander. WE currently do not have a way to score in the lander, but we are working on making changes which include a new intake!Our Autonomous can detach from the lander every time, and can score the gold minerals and moves to the depot almost every time. For now we can only do auto on the depot side. Our Hanging mechanism uses a GoBuilda lead screw to lift up and lower the robot. It uses a Neverest 60 motor and is geared up to have more speed. It currently has a hang time of 7.5 seconds. It also has wheels on the screw to line itself up to keep from damaging the robot. Our Intake uses surgical tubing on zip-ties to collect minerals. It has 3 separate collecters to move it along so that we no longer have to dump the minerals into our outtake. It also has wheels on the front so it can roll in and out of the crater with out moving the intake.
Peanut

Peanut

Robot in 3 Days 2018-2019
Peanut uses a standard tank drive with tape on them to stop squeaking on the mats. For our intake we use a linear slide which it is attached to so we can extend into the crater without going into it, which saves time. After collecting minerals we unextend and dumps in into the dumper, which then raises up using another linear slide and dumps them into the lander with 2 servos. Our robot is only capable of scoring minerals and cannot hang, but it can score in the lander reliably. We unfortunately do not have a auto.
Coconut

Coconut

Relic Recovery 2017-2018
Our robot this season is a holonomic drive with onmi wheels. A holonomic drive is when the wheels are mounted at 90 degrees from each other, instead of a standard tank drive where all the wheels are mounted facing the same direction. We chose this because it allows us to easily maneuver around the field. We also have a direct drive, which is where the wheels are attached directly to the motor, instead of using gears or chain, which can slip, making the robot unreliable. The most innovative feature of our robot is the tennis ball we attached to the bottom. It pushes the balancing stone down, so that the robot can climb it without the motors becoming caught on the edge.